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Recent stuff

Nothing Existed Except the Eyes of the Maharshi by N.R. Krishnamurti Aiyer. Oct. 29, 2001

Who Are You? An Interview With Papaji by Jeff Greenwald. Oct. 24, 2001

An Interview with Byron Katie by Sunny Massad. Oct. 23, 2001

An Interview with Douglas Harding by Kriben Pillay. Oct. 21, 2001

The Nectar of Immortality by Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj. Oct. 18, 2001

The Power of the Presence Part Two by David Godman. Oct. 15, 2001

The Quintessence of My Teaching
by Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj. Oct. 3, 2001

Interview With David Godman. Sept. 28, 2001

The Power of the Presence Part One by David Godman. Sept. 28, 2001

Nothing Ever Happened Volume 1 by David Godman. Sept. 23, 2001

Collision with the Infinite by Suzanne Segal. Sept. 22, 2001

Lilly of the Valley, the Bright and Morning Star by Charlie Hopkins. August 9, 2001


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Copyright 2001 Realization.org.

 

 
 
  REFERENCE
 

Classics

 

This website contains complete English translations of the following works:


Aitareya Upanishad
This is one of the shortest of the major Upanishads. It contains a creation myth.


Anapanasati Sutta
(Mindfulness of Breathing Sutta)
In this sutta, which is one of the most important Theravada texts, Buddha sets forth a roadmap to the entire course of meditation practice using the vehicle of breath meditation.


Ashtavakra Gita

also called Ashtavakra Samhita

This ancient Sanskrit text probably dates to the classic Vedanta period. Nothing is known about the author. Taking the form of a highly compressed dialog between a teacher and student, it presents the ideas of Advaita Vedanta and Jnana Yoga with a clarity and power that have rarely been matched.


Bhagavad Gita
This epic is the best-loved scripture in Hinduism and one of the most famous works of world literature. It is both a sublime poem and a yoga textbook. Mahatma Gandhi reached enlightenment by following its instructions.


Crest Jewel of Wisdom
This book, traditionally attributed to Sankara, is one of the most famous works of Jnana Yoga. It explains how to attain liberation by practicing viveka or discrimination, through which one learns to distinguish what is really the Self from what is not.


Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta

(Setting the Wheel of Dhamma in Motion Sutta)

According to tradition, this is the first talk Buddha gave after his awakening. He tells his first five disciples that he woke up because he arrived at pure knowledge of the Four Noble Truths in all their permutations.


Ellam Ondre
By Vijai R. Subramaniyam
Ramana Maharshi said, "If you want liberation, write, read, and practice the instructions in Ellam Ondre."


Forty Verses on Reality
By Ramana Maharshi
This short, highly compressed work of Ramana's has been translated into English more times than any other work of his. It is probably the most comprehensive single statement of his teachings.


Gospel of Thomas
Translated by Stephan Patterson and Marvin Meyer
Some scholars believe that this gospel is an earlier, more accurate record of Jesus's sayings than the four gospels included in the Bible.


Isa Upanishad
This is one of the shortest of the major Upanishads. It usually appears first in traditional compilations.


Katha Upanishad

One of the most famous and widely-translated Upanishads. The King of Death explains the nature of the Self and how to realize it.


Kena Upanishad
The theme of this short Upanishad is the paradoxical nature of knowing God. If you consider yourself to be the performer of actions, such knowledge is impossible.


Maha-Satipatthana Sutta
(Great Frames of Reference Sutta or Great Foundations of Mindfulness Sutta)
This sutta offers comprehensive practical instructions on the practice of mindfulness meditation.


Mandukya Upanishad
Consisting of only twelve verses, this is the shortest Upanishad. According to Sankaracharya, this Upanishad, together with Gaudapada's commentary on it, "contains the epitome of the substance of the import of Vedanta."


Prasna Upanishad
One of the major Upanishads. It describes the five types of prana. Translated by F. Max Müller.


Sat-Cakra-Nirupana
By Purnananda Swami
This classic work of Tantric Yoga describes the six cakras and explains how Kundalini rises through them to achieve union with Siva. It was written in the sixteenth century by a Bengali yogi.


Self-Enquiry
By Sri Ramana Maharshi
This is Ramana's first work, written in 1901 when he was 22 years old. He explains how to practice self-enquiry and gives an overview of the other methods for attaining self-realization. This translation is by T.M.P. Mahadevan.


Taittiriya Upanishad
This Upanishad is of special importance to students of Advaita Vedanta and Jnana Yoga because it's the only one that sets forth the doctrine of the five kosas or sheaths that conceal the true Self.


Viveka-Chudamani
This book, traditionally attributed to Sankara, is one of the most famous works of Jnana Yoga. It explains how to attain liberation by practicing viveka or discrimination, through which one learns to distinguish what is really the Self from what is not.


Yoga Sutras
By Patanjali
This is the earliest known instruction manual of yoga. It outlines a system which is known variously as Classical Yoga, Patanjali Yoga, Raja Yoga, and Ashtanga (Eight-limbed) Yoga.

 

This page was published on May 21, 2000 and last revised on May 11, 2001.


Copyright 2001 Realization.org. All rights reserved.